How Long Is A Chicago Marriage License Valid?

How Long Is A Chicago Marriage License Valid?

One of the many questions that have been asked by prospective couples when it comes to marriage licenses is its duration in Chicago. If you’re one of those that have been perplexed by this, then you have come to the right webpage. We’ll take a look at the Chicago marriage license as well as its validity period.

Chicago has a 60 days marriage license warranty period. This simply means that prospective marriage mates will need to apply and have their licenses approved less than two months before their wedding. In addition to that, people seeking to get married in the state of Illinois will need to ensure that they will have their wedding ceremony in the state. This is to ensure that their license is not invalidated or nullified.

While most states have settled for the 90 days validity period, Illinois, the state where Chicago is found has made it clear to all that the validity period is 60 days. While the requirements in each state may vary, the state of Illinois has a couple of unique requirements that prospective marriage mates will need to take to heart if they want their wedding to be validated. In the course of this piece, we’ll take a look at some of these requirements.

Like some of the other states in the country, the state of Illinois expects that the couple to be married is present when applying for this license. However, there are exceptions to this rule. For example, prospective couples with either of their mates hospitalized may apply for this license without their mates present. For this to happen in Chicago and the state of Illinois, there must be substantial proof that the individual is unable to walk. Also, the cause of ailment must be identified and it would be properly scrutinized to ensure that it was not a deliberate act. In addition to this, the individual will have to be tested to ensure that he or she has the right mental capacity to enter into a contract. These factors will be taken into consideration. In the state of Illinois, a partner may be absent during the marriage license application process if he or she has been incarcerated. Also, exceptions could be made if the partner serves under the United States Military and has not been granted permission to be present during the process.

Individuals under the age of 18 cannot get married in Chicago except they are able to present a consent form from either their parents or from a presiding judge. In Chicago, one of the main reasons why this consent form is accepted could probably be if the other partner is pregnant. Before the license is granted, the couple will have to present substantial proof that they are able to care for themselves financially.

In Chicago and in the state of Illinois in general, you cannot get married if you have been legally married without any legal divorce. This simply means that even if you have separated completely from your partner without a formal divorce, you cannot get married in the state.

In Chicago, there is a 60 days validity period for your marriage license. Unlike some of the other states, the 60 days period does not count the day you receive the application, it starts a day after. While most states will require applicants to wait for at least 72 hours after receiving their license before their wedding, prospective marriage mates will simply have to wait for at least 48 hours. This sets this state apart from some of the other states. Surprisingly, in Chicago, if the person you get married to have been deemed unfit to legally get married, this does not in any way invalidate or nullify your marriage. Your marriage remains legal in the eyes of the government of the state and must be recognized in other states.

For prospective couples who have plans to change their names after their wedding, the city of Chicago has made it pretty easy for them to do so. All they’ll have to do is visit the county with their marriage certificate and other necessary documents. This does not actually take time to complete.

For more information, be sure to visit www.usmarriagelaws.com.

Edward Powell

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *